Marcelo Cosme

Time of color correction

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In a blockbuster film or tv series what is the average time of color correction?

Sometimes I think we run so much due to the term of the channels and producers here in Brazil.

How do you work when you receive a material to create the look?

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Sam Gilling    7

Like Tom said it depends on a few factors. I've got a feature coming up next week but it's only 84 minutes and 300-ish shots, so I don't think I'll need more than 3-4 days on it, and even that'd be taking it slow.

As budgets go up then invariably time allocated to DI will too, especially when you have new versions of VFX shots being swapped in/out or last minute edit changes being made etc.

I'd say the standard for a studio feature is 2-3 weeks, but that can vary from The Revenant taking two months down to Sicario being done in under a week. 

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Margus Voll    157

It really depends on so many variables as said before.

Average i have done is in 2 weeks (10-14 days) More complex ones on 4 weeks with super heavy VFX and complex pipeline.

One i did in 7 days got ASC award. DOP was very very good and came in to grading with clear vision and well prepped.

So it depends a lot. 

Also keep in mind if you have to just color or do conform and delivery rendering and so on plus TV and VOD variations in grading. 

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Joseph Owens    17

If this was hanging driver-side doors on new Camaros coming down the Chevrolet assembly line, you could say 20 seconds per clip, do the math.  And wouldn't that be great?  We used to be able to plow through a semi-timed IP, feature length, marking events (Auto-detect and fix) 4 or 5 assembled lab rolls in about 20 hours or so. Edit density was low compared to today. DaVinci could store up to 999 events in a list.

I am looking at a feature open here now, 4.5K resolution, mostly R3D source, 1,781 events. I lose about 2 minutes every half hour to auto-save.  Don't know why its dragging -- oh, wait a minute, ACES IDT/ODT transforms, NR, 4.5K dpx reference stills, tracked, animated secondary qualifications, smart-cache...  Because I am re-creating a mismatched lighting setup in many scenes (editor went for story and not necessarily lighting continuity in master scenes) there is a large amount of synthetic foreground/background colorist-roto going on, so I have no way of estimating how long this project is going to take.  Although the DP took a great deal of care on-set, that work was undone by shuffling the chronology of the shot order.  

But all at national commercial quality standard, of course.  So when Saatchi & Saatchi stop by and use up a week deciding on 8 shots for a 20-30-second spot...  with a 4-figure/hr star facility -- that's for re-grading every pore on your 6-figure/hr supermodel.

Expectations really have to be managed because you cannot multiply that by 200 and hope that it even fits in the schedule.

jPo, CSI

 

 

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I've always thought a rule of thumb of one reel (22 minutes, is that right?) taking 8 hours is a good starting point. Plus a day or two for revisions and tweaks. Sometimes less sometimes more. Broadcast documentary of 50 odd minutes in a working day?  (I find that tricky).  

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On 6/16/2017 at 8:15 PM, Sam Gilling said:

Like Tom said it depends on a few factors. I've got a feature coming up next week but it's only 84 minutes and 300-ish shots, so I don't think I'll need more than 3-4 days on it, and even that'd be taking it slow.

As budgets go up then invariably time allocated to DI will too, especially when you have new versions of VFX shots being swapped in/out or last minute edit changes being made etc.

I'd say the standard for a studio feature is 2-3 weeks, but that can vary from The Revenant taking two months down to Sicario being done in under a week. 

FYI, We didn't do Sicario in under a week. We ended up using 60 hours to complete that DI. 

The lowest I usually get is movies that want to be done in about 60-65 hours. Those never have 3D or HDR pass to worry about. Movies like Rouge One, which had all the formats, took me months to complete and ended up using about 300 hours. So, it really can vary. 

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Sam Gilling    7
3 minutes ago, Mitch Paulson said:

FYI, We didn't do Sicario in under a week. We ended up using 60 hours to complete that DI. 

The lowest I usually get is movies that want to be done in about 60-65 hours. Those never have 3D or HDR pass to worry about. Movies like Rouge One, which had all the formats, took me months to complete and ended up using about 300 hours. So, it really can vary. 

Ah my bad, I was going off memory from an interview Roger Deakins did a while back. Found it - http://www.afcinema.com/Cinematographer-Roger-Deakins-BSC-ASC-discusses-his-work-on-Denis-Villeneuve-s-film-Sicario.html?lang=fr

Quote

 

What do you bring to the image during digital colour timing ?

RD : I sometimes hear certain cinematographers or colour timers explain that you can really create the film’s “look” using digital colour timing. That doesn’t make any sense to me. The visual identity of a film is created when it is shot, period. Sicario, like most of the films I have done, didn’t take more than seven days of work in the colour timing room. But those seven days are spent entirely with the colour timer, so that copy after copy, we obtain the final version. Overall, five days for the first version shown to Denis, then two days spent making the final corrections. A very simple, very direct step, where the few manipulations made to the image are essentially reduced to fixing the inaccuracies of colour that inevitably occur in modern outdoor daylight shooting conditions.

 

Can't wait for Blade Runner btw.

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yeah, we did a full week and spilled over into the following week. We then still had vfx shots and titles being dropped in. So really it was almost 2 weeks to finish it. 

And Blade Runner is going to be really cool!

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Margus Voll    157

It probably depends then how nicely it is done on set also.

I bet material from Deakins is super uniform to begin with ?

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In my neck of the woods it's usually:

Feature film: 10 - 12 days (depending on the shot-count, duration, uniformity of the footage, amount of different locations and budget) If the film has a fair amount of vfx, we usually get additional time to grade. Trim passes for other deliverables get extra time added.

TV drama (45 min ep): 3 - 5 days (depending on the same circumstances as stated above)

The numbers refer to the time you have to complete the grade from an ungraded 'blank canvas' with no pre-grading done in advance, right through to final approval. Timeline-conform and splitt-checking has been done in advance.

Sidenote: Another 'rule of thumb' I have heard is 1 hour grading time for every minute film. But as you see, the time I usually get is less, at least for episodic TV-drama.

cheers

Dylan

dylanhopkin.com

 

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Emily Haine    21

In my experience, two days on a drama episode is usually enough. Sometimes the lead will do a touch-up and final adjustments when the whole season is worked through. With new digital delivery specifications, it could require some extra attention but that is usually performed by the mastering guys.

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On 6/18/2017 at 10:18 PM, Mitch Paulson said:

We ended up using 60 hours to complete that DI. 

The lowest I usually get is movies that want to be done in about 60-65 hours. Those never have 3D or HDR pass to worry about. Movies like Rouge One, which had all the formats, took me months to complete and ended up using about 300 hours. So, it really can vary. 

That must have been a very efficient process as that's not many hours considering creative processes often include inputs and involvement from many creatives. Did you feel 60 hours was 'enough' or did you face any budget limitations on Sicario?

 

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3 hours ago, Nicolas Hanson said:

That must have been a very efficient process as that's not many hours considering creative processes often include inputs and involvement from many creatives. Did you feel 60 hours was 'enough' or did you face any budget limitations on Sicario?

 

We do have a very efficient process at EFilm. With that movie, there weren't a lot of creatives involved. Roger and I did our pass, then would present to Denis. He has a lot of trust in Roger, so we didn't get a ton of changes from him. There also weren't a ton of vfx shots either. The ones we did have were fairly simple. We didn't have to spend a lot of time having to updating shots. So, with all that, 60 hours was plenty for that movie. There weren't any budget restrictions on it really, we had more time allowed for the DI, we just didn't need it all. 

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