Thomas Singh

Beauty retouching

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I came across this Scratch tutorial about beauty retouching. In still photography, retouchers often tend to use cloning, healing and B/D techniques. What is your approach to beauty work?

 

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We also have some quick n' dirty tricks that might work for video like a technique called Band Pass or Inverted High Pass.  It's a variation of a common technique known as Frequency Separation. I imagine if it's keyed in for skin tones it might work. 

 

Explanation for the techy: http://sean-blog.twicebakedphoto.com/2010/08/vf-tools-of-trade.html\

More simple breakdown: http://www.derek-johnston.co.uk/blog/2014/2/tutorial-inverted-high-pass

Frequency Separation: https://fstoppers.com/post-production/ultimate-guide-frequency-separation-technique-8699

Though nobody likes to admit it. when we are in a pinch we sometimes use frequency separation and this plugin on the low frequency layer. http://www.imagenomic.com/pt.aspx Sometimes it's just much faster to use the plugin to fix patchiness than manually cloning. Also adjusting the luminance of the red vs. yellow can help smooth patchiness. Normally you'll have to lighten reds, darken yellows.

 

 

Edited by cameronrad
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Thanks for posting Thomas.
I made this tutorial almost 5 years ago.
For sure there is new cool stuff in Scratch now that I'd use.

I am actually looking forward to use Baselight 5.0 with the retouching, grid warper and frequency separation features.

 

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I don't do much Beauty touch ups, and most of what I do is pretty quick turnaround, so I just use the quickest tricks, personally.

Lowering the "Midtone Detail" option in Resolve is great for that (which is based on frequency separation).

And I use the Hue vs Hue curve when skin colour is inconsistent (bad make-up, etc...)

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I just did this lingerie xmas spot where the model was not as smooth as you see it in final results.

Could i have gone in more detail sure but would needed more powerful machine also as 4k delivery is asked in the end. From shot to shot you can gather the actual skin under the correction and probably feel what was going on. Will not share originals here.

Key trick was parallel nodes with masking + heavy blur with heavy feather and some grain on top of it to kill plastic feeling.
Could id be done in more detail? Sure but we had time and budget that limited it a bit.
 

 

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On 1.12.2016 at 3:52 PM, cameronrad said:

 It's a variation of a common technique known as Frequency Separation

Hi Cameron, can you please explain what the frequency separation is all about?

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If the model got light skin you would like to hide the blue / magenta beneath the surface, especially around the eyes. Just like girls do in real life to make the skin look more healthy and to make the eyes pop. Adding some warmth to knock out those colors will often result in some more "life" to the model even if you want to keep the overall skin tones natural. 

Edited by Abby Bader
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What technique do you prefer for skin smoothing? I will leave wrinkles and pimples to the Flame guys but since I got better keyer/tracker I want to do the first pass getting rid of the skin pores around the nose area.

Edited by Nicolas Hanson

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Often, I think you have to track different parts of the face, treating (say) the forehead separately from the area under the eyes, and the neck separately from the face. I find SNR in Resolve can be helpful (with a qualified key), and sometimes negative midtone detail. It depends on the nature of the original material.

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On 30.3.2017 at 11:29 PM, Nicolas Hanson said:

What technique do you prefer for skin smoothing?

Tonal skin rendering is controlled by how we blend the three channels, so you should treat them seperately if you want fine control. The blue channel represents detail, and red tends to have smoother tones than green. You can use this insight to adjust the values to your liking. You could also blur different channels.

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