Lowepost

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About Lowepost

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  1. Learn essential and advanced chroma keying techniques in our new DaVinci Resolve Fusion course! This course will prepare you to take up any complex task such as poorly lit green-screens, spill issues, fine details, reflections, tracking marks, soft lenses, and much more with confidence. Read more here
  2. Yes, all the shots are included. Also a set of power grades and a grain sample.
  3. Hi Anders. We stopped and did some look lessons in the professional color grading courses instead. When it comes to our plan for color grading and look creation training we will release a masterclass with one of the top colorists in Hollywood before the summer.
  4. In this course you will learn essential and advanced chroma keying techniques in DaVinci Resolve Fusion. Instructor, Lee Lanier explores a range of techniques to give you the tools you need to create the perfect key, over and over again. Lee will solve complex shots with poorly lit green-screens, spill issues, fine details, reflections, tracking marks, soft lenses, and much more. Typical shots you have to deal with in production. Chroma keying can be a very time-intensive process that ends with a bad result, but the techniques you will learn in this course will prepare you to take up any complex task with confident and deliver a good result. The chroma keying course is taught by Lee Lanier which has written several books on the topic and teached chroma keying techniques at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood. The footage and assets used in this course are available for download so that you can easily follow along. Download project files tomorrow About the instructor Lee Lanier has created visual effects on numerous features films for Walt Disney Studios and PDI/DreamWorks. Lee is a world-renowned expert in the video effects field, and has written several popular high-end software books, and taught at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood. Who is this course designed for? DaVinci Resolve users Compositors Finishing artists Lessons overview 01: Introduction 02: Chroma Keyer 03: Ultra Keyer 04: Luma keyer 05: Delta keyer 06: Spill supression 07: Keying bluescreen 08: Removing tracking marks 09: Combining keyers 10: Additional matte inputs 11: Custom luma masks 12: Keying in color tab 13: Sending a matte to the color tab Software required DaVinci Resolve
  5. In this course you will learn essential and advanced chroma keying techniques in Adobe After Effects. Instructor, Lee Lanier will explore a range of different techniques to give you the tools you need to create the perfect key, over and over again. Most of the time will be used inside of After Effect's Keylight, which is the go-to-keyer for many compositors, and Lee will solve complex shots with poorly lit green-screens, soft lenses, blonde hair details and much more. We know this is what you have to deal with in production. Chroma keying can be a very time-intensive process that ends with a bad result, but the techniques you will learn in this course will prepare you to take up any complex task with confident and deliver a good result. The chroma keying course is taught by Lee Lanier which has written several books on the topic and teached chroma keying techniques at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood. The footage and assets used in this course are available for download so that you can easily follow along. Download project files About the instructor Lee Lanier has created visual effects on numerous features films for Walt Disney Studios and PDI/DreamWorks. Lee is a world-renowned expert in the video effects field, and has written several popular high-end software books, and taught at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood. Who is this course designed for? Compositors Lessons overview 01: Introduction 02: Extract 03: Color Range 04: Linear Color Key 05: InnerOuter Key 06: Color Difference Key 07: Difference Matte 08: Keylight 09: Spill Supression 10: Adjusting Mattes 11: Matte Effects 12: Garbage and Core Masks 13: Other Spill Techniques 14: Refine Matte Effects 15: Using a Second Keyer 16: Custom Luma Mattes Software required After Effects
  6. You should balance prior to the LUT (or custom curve) and watch the result through the LUT (or custom curve). No. You should balance prior to the curve and judge the balance by watching the corrections through the curve.
  7. That's true and the reason we put the line up at about 60 IRE and not higher. The other explanation was to point out that the luminance ranges from black on the left side to white on the right side.
  8. This is the ultimate course for editors and conform artists who want to learn everything about conforming inside of DaVinci Resolve! With 21 lessons and almost 5 hours of in-depth DaVinci Resolve training, Kevin McAuliffe will take you through every step and technical detail of the process from conforming media to mastering the final picture. About the instructor Kevin is an award winning editor and visual effects creator based in Toronto with over 15 years of teaching and training experience. Over the past years Kevin has delivered world-class work for clients such as Warner Bros, Walt Disney Company, 20th Century Fox, Universal and Elevation Pictures. Who is this course designed for? Editors Conform Artists Colorists Software required A free version of DaVinci Resolve or DaVinci Resolve Studio. Avid. Premiere and Final Cut X are used in some of the lessons. This training series is sponsored by our friends at digitalrebellion.com
  9. It can be hard to see small differences in compressed files, so most of the corrections in all the lessons are overdone a bit to the make the result more noticeable for the viewer. That's something we mention several times in the course and we do encourage the viewers to be much more careful with the values than we are when judging the final result on the grading monitor. With this technique you should be able to even out the differences and get a great looking result without affecting the hair. Even on very complex shots with a lot of neighbouring tones. Also note that in this example we demonstrate how to play the two hues against each other to affect imbalance in the entire shot, but you can isolate the effect to affect only the skin tones if you create more separation between skin and hair in the balance node and pick more specific hue ranges. You can even apply the techniques inside of a key to isolate it even further, but in most cases you will be perfectly fine by playing the curves against each other. It will give a much cleaner result, and if you discover that some hues are affected negatively you can counter balance the shot after the hue shift with the offset.
  10. Thanks for your patience. Lesson 09 (Color Harmony) is updated together with a new clip and powergrade.
  11. You will have to change input color space to match the camera, in your case the Sony. The timeline color space can still be Arri Log C because you don't want your controls to behave different each time you're working with a new camera format.
  12. The input color space should be set to the camera color space which in this case is Alexa Log C because Alexa footage is used in the example. When it comes to the timeline color space in general, it only affects the "feel" of the controls, so it's purely a matter of taste. From our understanding Alexa Log C is definitely the most common timeline color space used in the professional world and especially among Baselight users.
  13. Thanks @James Lakey. We have seen this particular setup a couple of times, but you will quite different results by playing around in the same area, shifting hue angles and adjusting the strengths. The combination of dialing in extreme colors and mapping them to the tonal range by adjusting the strength is an extremely powerful technique that allows numerous of looks, but it can take some time to get used to. This is just an example. When it comes to hitting the numbers in general in all the lessons it's because we have walked through the lessons several times prior to recording and don't want to waste your time "experimenting on screen".
  14. We are not referring to order of operations inside of nodes at 04:09 in lesson 08. Th difference is that we are dialing in exposure AFTER the color adjustments and not the other way around as seen in all the other lessons. This is because we want to demonstrate the impact brightness and contrast adjustments has on color and the reason why we encourage you to do it the other way around.