Rakesh Malik

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About Rakesh Malik

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  • Birthday 12/18/1972

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  • Website
    http://www.WhiteCranePhotography.com

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  1. I didn't mean to imply that I have something against using power windows, just that I don't use them as much as I used to. But I think I was using them a lot because of the fact that my lighting wasn't great. so rather than using power windows to enhance the images, I was using them to FIX the images. Not allowing them at all sounds excessive to me too, but not relying on them to fix my blunders has been liberating. Now I have more time to be creative rather than spending most of my time in the color suite fixing things. I'm looking forward to seeing One Upon a Time in Hollywood... when I manage to free up some time to go to the theater
  2. I don't have any experience with the remove viewer myself, but I have had good luck getting help from Alex Salazar at HP: alex.tsu.salazar@hp.com He probably doesn't know much about the remote viewer since he's AFAIK a hardware guy, but he might be able to get you in touch with someone who can.
  3. Doing my own color is one of the things that's made me a better cinematographer. It meant that whenever I screwed something up on set, I was the one who had to fix it in post... so I had front row seats on finding (and fixing) my own blunders... so on subsequent shoots I'd remember those blunders and avoid them. Nowadays I use power windows a LOT less than I used to, because I learned to sculpt and control light a lot more on set because having basically screwed myself, I knew what to look for the next time around. Of course there are always new ways to screw things up, and when you end up shooting one scene in two parts split two months apart (we needed the waterfall to change its volume drastically during the scene, so...) or when you film one of the actors 80 miles away and in completely different light (the elk didn't get the call sheet) and have to match those it's still work, but for me lately that sort of extra work is a lot more common than, "Ah crap, I should have flagged the light off of that wall back there." I honestly think I've learned more about cinematography by studying color grading and editing than I have from any cinematography oriented class/seminar/etc I've taken.
  4. The tutorial series on SGO's YouTube channel are quite good. Mistika does have a steeper learning curve than Scratch and also IMO Resolve. It's easier to get a project conformed and working in both than in Mistika for a newbie, mainly because Mistika's UI is rather unconventional. Once you're done with that and actually working with the color corrector, then things look nicer. I'm getting spoiled by being able to just add layers in a color corrector and also being able to use that color corrector as a node in a composite. Being able to pull a key with the color corrector and then output that as an alpha channel makes for much more compact node trees than in Fusion. I can Maynard key with 10 nodes instead of 30.
  5. Yes, he mentioned that while I was chatting with him after the press conference.
  6. Eating into Adobe's market is pretty much inevitable. You might be able to get your wish there -- Grant mentioned that BMD is looking into offering other smaller versions, possibly including one that's just the jog knob section of the keyboard.
  7. Cinema4D is HUGE in mograph -- partly due to being far easier to use than most of its competition, but also just because Maxon's been very good with things like support and stability. The Mograph module is excellent -- useful for more than mograph. A lot more. It's also pretty big in matte painting. Houdini is a LOT easier to learn than its reputation would imply though, because SideFX has been working on making it more user friendly over the last few years as well as improving its underlying technology. For ease of use Cinema4D still rules the roost though.
  8. I started working with Mistika Boutique and I'm so far very impressed overall. SGO is definitely working toward making it more accessible to people not already familiar with it. Just to prevent disappointment though, the Black Magic support isn't in there yet, it's planned for the next release (I think it's for 8.8.2), and 8.8.1 is now in open beta. I'm using it with an AJA video I/O that I snagged a great deal on, and I also have a Black Magic Mini-Monitor that I use for Resolve. But I'm planning to transition to Mistika as my primary color + finishing solution since the more familiar I get with Mistika, the nicer I'm finding it. That said, there are some awkward UI quirks that are a bit off-putting to those not familiar with it that are legacies of the turnkey system. SGO is working on smoothing that stuff out, and is actively soliciting feedback on it.
  9. Especially if the affordable pricing included a Windows option... that would make things VERY interesting. I think it's definite that BMD will have some Fusion updates to show off, but I have a feeling that it's going to retain the pipelined approach rather than the pretty much transparent integration that applications like Mistika and Scratch have.
  10. Thanks for sharing! We don't often see articles about how established professionals became established, and I think it's important for newcomers to freelancing to understand how important it is to build relationships.
  11. And perfect timing too, since I have a couple of films to color grade soon and I'm also going to get a 1080Ti add to my computer shortly.