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Hello!  In case you don't already know, your eye glasses that have anti-glare do cause a slight color shift.  To see this easily, look at something bright or white and raise your glasses back and forth.  I use glasses without antiglare to grade, however it helps when grading with clients who don't know and they seem to see everything with a green or magenta bias.  Just a heads up:)

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Is this a problem for all glasses with anti-glare coatings?

It's only that lenses have anti-glare coatings, and I would have expected them not to alter the spectral response - or do they have an extra element in the lens to correct for this?

Edited by Bruno Mansi

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37 minutes ago, Bruno Mansi said:

Is this a problem for all glasses with anti-glare coatings?

It's only that lenses have anti-glare coatings, and I would have expected them not to alter the spectral response - or do they have an extra element in the lens to correct for this?

Anti glare is a film they put on the outside of glasses. Although, most will not notice, as a colorist, the slight shift is percievable. You can see a slight green or magenta reflected in  glasses at an angle. This also drives me crazy watch period features taking place earlier than the 80's and I can see the antiglare on the actors glasses. 

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1 hour ago, heather said:

Anti glare is a film they put on the outside of glasses. Although, most will not notice, as a colorist, the slight shift is percievable. You can see a slight green or magenta reflected in  glasses at an angle.

Yea, I got that from the original post. What I was asking is, if all these coatings create colour shifts,  how they deal with this on lens coatings.

1 hour ago, heather said:

This also drives me crazy watch period features taking place earlier than the 80's and I can see the antiglare on the actors glasses.

I also get somewhat distracted by actors who are obviously wearing a pair of glasses with plain glass as lenses!

Edited by Bruno Mansi

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I've noticed this effect it in the following way.  Let's say you have a thumbnail on the timeline of a black and white gradient, then you turn your head about 30 degrees to the right or left, watch the middle of the gradient (middle grey) to see if it goes warm to cool or what looks like blue to brown.  However, straight on I didn't see any color shift.  Just my personal experience.  It's much much less noticable if the gradient is full screen. I forget the name of the coating but it was on high end Nikon lenses. Truth is I'm not sure actually if it was the coating or not in my case though I'm guessing that.

Screen Shot 2020-06-09 at 1.09.45 AM.png

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