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Just want to share a technique I like to use if I want to make more saturated colors darker without a qualifier.
I recorded a short video showing it.

This is not a 'look' tutorial. Just a technique. I'm sure many of you already use this in some way. But maybe someone will find it useful.
I exaggerated the effect to make it more visible. Of course blending with the original is your friend. 

 

Edited by Anton Meleshkevich
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I've just recorded one more video :) and changed a title of the thread.
This time about white balancing with a gray card (or whatever neutral) with a clear visual control of neutral colors. Hope, someone will find it useful.

 

Edited by Anton Meleshkevich

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I really love your techniques, but I wished you would quickly explain the reasoning behind them for less experienced colorists. For example why did you switch to HSL and disable channel 1 and 3, and then converted to HSV afterwards?  Or why selecting just low saturation helps with correcting white balance? I think if you would have added just a little bit of explanation to your videos, it could potentially help a lot of people. 

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@Daniel Tuerner   In HSL and HSV saturation works differently. In HSL desaturating makes colors darker. In HSV - brighter. So at first I make colors darker by desaturating in HSL. And then I also make them darker by increasing saturation in HSV.

In another video I select lowest saturation colors, because they are basically almost neutral colors (with little to no saturation).
Then I tint them with a strong and noticeable green fill by curves. This allows me to see all neutral gray colors in green. Actually not just true neutral gray colors, but also pixels with a little bit of saturation. They are not neutral of course, but with any footage shot on real camera this is ok and even preferable because of noise and lots of other imperfections of the real world. If I made a node tree which only indicates real true neutral gray, that would be unusable. For example even on expensive color checkers dark gray and light gray patches have slightly different tint. You can't make them all look 100% neutral by using only WB control in RAW or RGB Gain operation in linear gamma. And in my example (macbeth colorchecker) neutral patches are not even designed to be actually neutral. Only 2 or 3 of them are supposed to be actually neutral. I don't remember which ones exactly, but definitely not the brightest one.

Also I forgot to set de-noising to highest quality in the video. This is essential. Otherwise denoiser can desaturate some colors and that makes the whole node tree useless. I added this as a pinned comment.

Edited by Anton Meleshkevich

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