Masterclass in Color Grading with Douglas Delaney

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Douglas Delaney works as a senior colorist at Technicolor in Los Angeles, and has color graded many of the most known features and drama series in the world. In his masterclass you are invited into his color suite to watch how built his grades, discuss color grade techniques, workflows and strategies that will help you become a better colorist.

The course is about the art and craft of color grading and is not designed to teach the operations of a specific software.

About the instructor

Douglas Delaney is a world-renowned senior colorist working at Technicolor in Los Angeles. He has crafted images for many top directors and worked on blockbusters and dramas such as Captain Marvel, The Equalizer, Jumanji, The Loudest Voice, and the The Hot Zone.

Who is this course designed for?

  • Colorists

COURSE OVERVIEW

 

LESSON 01: INTRO

Meet Douglas

LESSON 02: COLOR SPACE JOURNEY AND FAMILY DRT

Douglas talks about the color space journey in his color corrector and about the family DRT used on this show.

LESSON 03: THE GRADE OF THE SHOW

In this lesson Douglas talks about how he approached the color grade on this show, and the order of grade operations.

LESSON 04: TIME & RIPPLING

In this lesson Douglas demonstrates an effective ripple function in Baselight and discuss time management.

LESSON 05: LOOK CREATION & COLOR ROOM

Now it’s time to be more creative, and Douglas discuss different look creation techniques. He also share some thoughts about how to prepare for color grading sessions and to deal with conflicting interests in the color room.

LESSON 06: SCOPES

Douglas discuss when and why he uses the scopes.

LESSON 07: INSPIRATION

Thoughts on how to get inspired and keep staying on top of your game

 

 

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Could someone expand on how your default colorspace can be different from what it's recorded in?  For example, when he said he always likes to work in LogC and he mentioned something being  shot on Venice.  Do you just use a DRT to get the Venice into LogC and go from there?  

Thanks in advance.

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4 hours ago, Jeremy Miller said:

Could someone expand on how your default colorspace can be different from what it's recorded in?  For example, when he said he always likes to work in LogC and he mentioned something being  shot on Venice.  Do you just use a DRT to get the Venice into LogC and go from there?  

Thanks in advance.

Lots of reasons to work in a specific colour space but I tend to do this because you get to understand how a single colour space responds. Means you know how colours are mapped or can be mapped to create the look/changes you want. But to answer your question yes you can map SLog into LogC with a CST or similar. It's important to stay in scene ref space so you can make the most of the signal captured hence Slog to LogC. Then when you output you remap it again to the (normally) smaller colour space for delivery. I sometimes just play around with the different colour spaces to see what it's doing to the footage but most of the time I'm remapping everything to either LogC or DWG these days.

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6 hours ago, Jamie Neale said:

Lots of reasons to work in a specific colour space but I tend to do this because you get to understand how a single colour space responds. Means you know how colours are mapped or can be mapped to create the look/changes you want. But to answer your question yes you can map SLog into LogC with a CST or similar. It's important to stay in scene ref space so you can make the most of the signal captured hence Slog to LogC. Then when you output you remap it again to the (normally) smaller colour space for delivery. I sometimes just play around with the different colour spaces to see what it's doing to the footage but most of the time I'm remapping everything to either LogC or DWG these days.

I was reading the new Resolve 17 manual last night after posting this and came across exactly how to set it up in Resolve.  Between your answer and reading that it all makes sense now 

Edited by Jeremy Miller
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17 hours ago, Jeremy Miller said:

I was reading the new Resolve 17 manual last night after posting this and came across exactly how to set it up in Resolve.  Between your answer and reading that it all makes sense now 

Great stuff, glad I could help a little.

As an example... Whilst setting up a job recently I had a problem with a blue coloured shirt that the main character was wearing when working natively with DWG and SLog. I tried LogC instead and the colour started to behave itself and I was able to get much better starting point.

I'd definitely encourage you to play around with the controls in different colour spaces, never know when you might need to switch to suit the footage your sent to get the best result.

 

 

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On 5/9/2021 at 3:21 AM, Thomas d'Auteuil said:

As always, I really appreciate the masterclasses here at Lowepost. However, I feel that, in this one, a huge chunk of the work was done in preproduction and we don't get to see that part.

I wish we could have been given more insight into how that show LUT was elaborated.

Also, the footage was shot so incredibly well that little had to be done in post. I'm on Lowepost because I'm starting out and, so far, I've had to fix the colors and exposure on every single shot thrown at me. 

In other words, this masterclass felt more theoretical than practical.

🤟🏻

Edited by Kacey Baker
Found what I was looking for in the non ‘Hollywood Teacher’ videos 👍🏻👍🏻🕺🏻🕺🏻
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47 minutes ago, Fernanda Balestro said:

Very nice. On the look example you add cyan and Yellow saturation separatly. How do you do that in Resolve?

Add. Cyan in one node then add a serial node and make the yellow adjustment. This is assuming they are on the same color wheel (shadow, midtones or highlights, etc)

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